A Six-hour Interprofessional Symposium

Monday, December 9, 2019

8:45 am – 4:30 pm (EST)

Free for Eligible 1199SEIU Members

Seminar Brochure

Onsite

The Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College/CUNY
524 West 59th Street (Between 10th & 11th Avenues)
New York, NY 10019

Register for the Onsite Seminar (for Members)

Register for the Onsite Seminar (for Non-Members)

The deadline to register for onsite is 12:00 pm (EST), Friday, December 6, 2019.

Videocast will be available at:

1199SEIU Bronx Site
2501 Grand Concourse, 3rd Floor
Bronx, NY 10468

1199SEIU Hicksville Site
100 Duffy Avenue, 3rd Floor
Hicksville, NY 11801

1199SEIU Staten Island Site
790 Port Richmond Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10302

1199SEIU Westchester-White Plains Site
99 Church Street, 4th Floor
White Plains, NY 10601

Brookdale Hospital site
1 Brookdale Plaza – Alumni Hall
Brooklyn, NY 11212

1199SEIU Florida-UHealth Don Soffer Clinical Research Center
1120 NW 14th Street, Room 1270A
Miami, FL 33136

Register for Videocast (Member)

Register for Videocast (Non-Member)

The deadline to register for the videocast is 12:00 pm (EST), Friday, December 6, 2019.

Webcast

Register for Webcast (Member)

Register for Webcast (Non-Member)

The deadline to register for the webcast is 12:00 pm (EST), Friday, December 6, 2019.

Program and Learning Objectives

8:45 am — Registration

9:20 am — Welcome and Introductory Remarks

9:30 am — An Overview of Colorectal Cancer

Presenter:

Arnold Markowitz, MD

Descriptive Summary:

Colon cancer forms in the tissues of the first part of the large intestine. Rectal cancer is a malignancy that develops in the rectum, which, along with the anal canal, makes up the last 6- to 8-inch part of the large intestine. These cancers, often referred to together as colorectal cancer, are among the most common forms of cancer diagnosed in the United States. An estimated 145,600 people in the U.S. are expected to be diagnosed with these cancers, and 51,020 are expected to die of these diseases in 2019, according to federal estimates.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. List the scope, incidence and impact of colon cancer in the United States;
  2. Outline the risk factors, screening tests and strategies for colon cancer prevention;
  3. Become knowledgeable about hereditary factors and syndromes associated with colon cancer;
  4. Describe the role of surgery and its options in the treatment of colon cancer;
  5. List the indications and options for chemotherapy in the management of colon cancer; and
  6. Explain the rationale for and optimal use of radiation therapy in treating colon cancer.

10:45 am — Non-invasive Imaging Colorectal Cancer in 2019: Achievements and Challenges

Presenter:

Viktoriya Paroder, MD, PhD

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the necessary screening processes and procedures to follow prior to entering
    the MR suite;
  2. Differentiate and categorize safety zones 1-4 within an MRI environment;
  3. Recognize MR related emergencies and explain how to handle such an event within the MR suite; and
  4. Discuss magnetism, magnetic fringe field and the importance of the 5 Gauss line.

8:00 pm — Radiation Safety

Presenter:

Eric Lobel, M.A., R.T(R)

Descriptive Summary:

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer for both men and women in the U.S., with an estimated 140,250 new cases of colorectal cancer in 2019. Ongoing advancements in screening and treatment approaches, including surgery and chemotherapy, continue to lead to significant improvements in diagnosis, treatment and survival. At the same time, advancements in imaging have expanded the role of radiologists at all stages of the disease management process, from pre-treatment evaluation and staging to post-operative and post-treatment management and surveillance. This course will describe the roles of different modalities, including computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), abdominal ultrasound, endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) and positron emission tomography (PET) in colorectal cancer management.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the imaging modalities used for colorectal cancer diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, such as CT, MRI, PET, CTC (Virtual Colonoscopy);
  2. Outline the basic principles of staging colorectal cancer;
  3. Explain how imaging contributes to treatment planning and follow-up;
  4. Describe how imaging is used for surveillance; and
  5. Outline the challenges associated with imaging.

11:30 am — Psychosocial Support of Colorectal Cancer Patients

Presenter:

Craig Blinderman, MD

Descriptive Summary:

A serious illness not only affects the patient’s quality of life, but it also impacts the patient’s family and community. To help reduce suffering and anxiety, palliative care should be introduced along with curative/disease modifying treatment as early as possible. Through a multidisciplinary team approach, patients and families can face the challenges of a serious illness together.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the philosophy of palliative care;
  2. Describe the domains of suffering and outline how palliative care can address them; and
  3. Outline various treatment modalities that are available in holistic care for cancer patients.

 

12:30 pm – Lunch Break

 

1:30 pm — One Strategy Does Not Fit All: Integration of Molecular Targeted Therapies and Checkpoint Inhibitors

Presenter:

Sara Kim, PharmD

Descriptive Summary:

Colorectal cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease with considerable variation in genomics, molecular biomarkers and tumor microenvironment. In this session, the management of colorectal cancer and personalized approaches to integrating targeted therapy and immunotherapy for emerging immune tumor biomarkers in metastatic disease will be discussed. In addition, toxicity profiles of targeted therapy and immunotherapy will be compared to conventional chemotherapy.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Review current treatment strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC);
  2. Identify actionable molecular biomarkers and describe the integration of targeted therapies into CRC management; and
  3. Describe notable toxicities associated with molecular targeted therapy and immunotherapy, and review recommended management strategies.

2:30 pm — Nutrition for Colorectal Cancer Patients

Presenter:

Marissa May, MS, RD

Descriptive Summary:

Advancements in screening and treatments for colorectal cancer provide an opportunity for patients diagnosed with the disease to work towards a healthy future. Maintaining their nutrition status, both during and after treatment, is associated with improved outcomes for patients. In this session, dietary recommendations for patients with colorectal cancer from diagnosis, through treatment and into survivorship, will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Outline dietary and lifestyle recommendations for the prevention and recurrence of colon cancer;
  2. List the goals of nutrition therapy during cancer treatment; and
  3. Specify dietary measures that will help patients manage their disease and the impact of treatment.

3:30 pm — Principles of Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer

Presenter:

Abraham Wu, MD

Descriptive Summary:

Radiation therapy has long been considered an important adjunct to surgery in the treatment of rectal cancer. The local recurrence rate has been reduced as a result of both effective surgical techniques and radiotherapy. For patients with stages II and III rectal cancer, preoperative chemoradiotherapy is now considered the standard of care. Short-course radiotherapy appears to provide effective local control and the same overall survival rate as longer-course chemoradiotherapy schedules and, therefore, may be an appropriate choice in some situations.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the concepts of local control and sphincter preservation in rectal cancer treatment;
  2. Describe the commonly used schedules and doses of radiation therapy in rectal cancer;
  3. Outline the evidence demonstrating the benefit of radiation therapy in the treatment of rectal cancer; and
  4. Describe the common short- and long-term side effects associated with radiation therapy for rectal cancer.

4:30 pm — Participants submit online evaluations.

 

Accreditation

CASACs

An application has been submitted to the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services for six (6) clock hours.

Clinical Laboratory Practitioners

This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) for six (6) CMLE credits. ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

Dietitians/Dietetic Technicians

This course is approved by the Commission for Dietetic Registration (CDR) for six (6) continuing education units.

Imaging Technologists

An application has been submitted to the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) for Category A continuing education credits. The American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) accepts ASRT Category A credits.

LPNs/RNs/Nurse Practitioners

This course is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing for six (6) continuing education credits.

Medical Records Coders

This course is approved by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) for six (6) continuing education credits.

Occupational Therapists/Occupational Therapy Assistants

An application has been submitted to the New York State Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. (NYSOTA) for contact hours (New York licensees only).

Paramedics/EMTs

An application has been submitted to the Regional Emergency Medical Services Council of New York City for EMS CME credits.

Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians

The New York State Council of Health-system Pharmacists (NYSCHP) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Module A (AM): This course, 0134-0000-19-160-L01-P; 0134-0000-19-160-L01-T, is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours).
Module B (PM): This course, 0134-0000-19-161-L01-P; 0134-0000-19-161-L01-T, is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours).

Statements of Continuing Pharmacy Education Credits are available to participants upon the conclusion of the program through survey links. Participants have 45 days from the date of the program to claim credits and must verify attendance at the meeting by entering the program CE code.

Physical Therapists/Physical Therapy Assistants

An application has been submitted to the New York Physical Therapy Association (NYPTA) for contact hours (New York licensees only).

Respiratory Therapists

This course is approved by the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC) six (6) for continuing education credits.

Social Workers

The 1199SEIU League Training and Upgrading Fund SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers under provider #0286. Licensed NYS Social Workers are required to provide their NYS license number to receive certificate of credit. This course is approved for six (6) continuing education hours.

All Other Healthcare Professionals will receive a general certificate of attendance. Please check with your accreditation board with respect to receiving credit for this program.

Presenters:

Arnold Markowitz, MD

Director, Gastroenterology Fellowship Training Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Viktoriya Paroder, MD, PhD

Radiologist, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Craig Blinderman, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of the Adult Palliative Medicine Service at Columbia University Medical Center/New-York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY

Sara Kim, PharmD

Oncology Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, The Mound Sinai Hospital, New York, NY

Marissa May, RD

Clinical Dietitian, NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY

Abraham Wu, MD

Residency Program Director, Department of Radiation Oncology; Assistant Attending, Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

 

Eligibility for 1199SEIU Members

League and Greater New York Members

To be eligible to attend 1199SEIU Training and Education Fund (TEF)-sponsored seminars and symposiums at no cost, you must have been a part-time or full-time employee for at least one year and work at least three-fifths of a regular workweek in a bargaining unit position of an employer who contributes to the 1199SEIU League Training and Upgrading Fund or the 1199SEIU Greater New York Education Fund.

City of New York Education, Child and Eldercare Fund Members

Pharmacists, Dietitians, Clinical Laboratory Practitioners and LPNs are all eligible to attend TEF-sponsored seminars and symposiums at no cost. You must have worked with NYC Health + Hospitals or a mayoral agency for at least one year.

For Further Information

Call (212) 894-4390
Email: Institute@1199Funds.org

Refund and Cancellation Policy

Registrants canceling must do so at least 48 hours before the program date to avoid a penalty. To cancel, contact the 1199SEIU League Training and Upgrading Fund by fax (212) 643-8795, telephone (212) 894-4390 or e-mail Institute@1199Funds.org. The 1199SEIU League Training and Upgrading Fund reserves the right to cancel or reschedule a program in the event of insufficient enrollment or unforeseen circumstances. Participants will be notified and given the option of a refund or to attend the rescheduled program, or an alternate program.

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